Seminar on Conservation and Restoration in Archaeology

On Friday, 13th March, at the Institut Català d’Arqueologia Clàssica (ICAC) auditorium.

Program and registrationespañol català

“The Conservation and Restoration in Archaeology: A Research and Dissemination Tool” is the title of the seminar imparted on Friday, 13th March, at the Institut Català d’Arqueologia Clàssica (ICAC) auditorium and carry out under the scientific co-direction of the conservator Anna Bertral, the archaeologist Josep M. Palet (ICAC) and Lucia Lopez-Polin, conservator of the Institut Català de Paleocologia Humana i Evolució Social (IPHES). This activity is under the SUMA program (which aim is to promote synergies between research centers of the Generalitat de Catalunya), coordinated by the Institut Català d’Investigació en Patrimoni Cultural (ICRPC), ICAC and IPHES.

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Restoration “in situ” the remains of a tapir at the site of Camp dels Ninots at Caldes de Malavella (Girona) – Lucía López-Polín/IPHES

It is particularly aimed to professionals from both disciplines (archeology and conservation-restoration) and especially to the students of the IPHES and ICAC masters’ student, as well as to students on Conservation and Restoration.

The seminar deals with the relationship between conservation-restoration and archaeology through specific examples from chronologically diverse  sites. The role the conservation-restoration as an auxiliary discipline of archaeology will be also addressed.

Different conservation and restoration works will be presented to show the benefits and the necessity of this discipline during the archaeological excavations.

The aim is also to generate a discussion among specialists about the archeology and conservation-restoration characteristics, challenges and needs for the development of collaborative works.

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Seminar on uses, destruction and protection of the cultural heritage in times of war

On Friday, February 20th at 9:30 hrs at the Researchers Residence CSIC in Barcelona

Program and registrationcatalàespañol

“The Cultural Heritage in Times of War” is the title of the seminar carry out on Friday, February 20th at 9:30 hrs at the Residence for Researchers CSIC (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas), located at the Hospital Street in Barcelona. Open and free access to the general public. The registration must be formalized with the adjacent filling in form.

Buddhas of Bamiyan (Afghanistan) before and after the destruction in 2001.(Wikimedia Commons)
Buddhas of Bamiyan (Afghanistan) before and after the destruction in 2001.(Wikimedia Commons)

This activity is under the SUMA program (which aim is to promote synergies between research centers of the Generalitat de Catalunya), coordinated by the Institut Català d’Investigació en Patrimoni Cultural (ICRPC), Institut Català d’Arqueologia Clàssica (ICAC) and the Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social (IPHES). In this case, is also supported by the CSIC, the Heritage for Peace Association and the CERCA (Centres dInvestigació de Catalunya), as well as the assistance of the Obra Social La Caixa and the Diputació de Girona.

The association with power

The historiographical debate on the uses, destruction and protection of cultural heritage in times of war continues today. Studying the iconoclastic attitudes in military and/or revolutionary contexts has become one of the main pillars of this debate. The primary association between iconoclasm and bandolism has given gradually step to a more complex analysis of the symbolism of art and heritage, and its relation with power. The wars of the XX century and the military conflicts of the XXI century are a clear testimony, and the clearest evidence that this problem is not yet solved.

Meeting with the archaeologist Eudald Carbonell on the future of humanity

Next Wednesday at 20 hrs. in the Metropol Cafè at Tarragona, free access

At the end of the event those who wish, with advance reservation, may enjoy a dinner with the scientist in a 12 euro menu

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Eudald Carbonell

“The future of humanity” is the title of the talk that will be offered by Eudald Carbonell, archaeologist and director of IPHES (Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social), next Wednesday at 20 hrs. in the Metropol Cafè at Tarragona, an co-organized act by the Unidad de Comunicación de la Ciencia of the Universitat Rovira i Virgili de Tarragona (URV) and La Curiosa, within the cycle of scientific gatherings “Science in the Metropol”.

Summary

The international conflicts that every day claim our congeners lives, the systemic crisis we are suffering, the social imbalances… are some of the many examples that show that we are not yet humans. What should we do to achieve this humanity? To reach this condition we must set out new challenges such as the critical consciousness of species and conscious progress or responsible evolution. On this attempt, the socialization of science and technology play a vital role.

Delicatessen

At the end of this talk, those who wish may stay for a dinner meeting with Eudald Carbonell in La Cuineta del Metropol. Metropol delicatessen will be served to share. Price: 12 euros per person. Reservations required by email to lacuriosa.sc@gmail.com or comciencia@urv.cat

Conference about pastoralism in Ancient Greece

By Paul Halstead, professor of Archeology at the University of Sheffield, on 9th February, at 12 pm in the ICAC

català

Paul Halstead, professor of Archeology at the University of Sheffield (England), will offer the lecture ” Transdisciplinary Studies of Pastoralism in Ancient Greece”, on 9th February, at 12 pm in the ICAC (Institut Català d’Arqueologia Clàssica), in Tarragona. This event is organized by ICAC, ICRPC (Institut Català de recerca en Patrimoni Cultural) and IPHES (Institut Català de Paleoeoclogia Humana I Evolució Social) (SUMA Project).

Paul-Halstead
Paul Halstead

Paul Halstead studied archaeology at Cambridge University, where the teaching of Tony Legge and Andrew Sherratt inspired an interest in pastoralism. He has conducted archaeological and zooarchaeological research in Greece and ethnoarchaeological study of traditional animal and crop husbandry in Greece and other parts of Mediterranean Europe.

Abstract

As elsewhere in Mediterranean Europe (and beyond), the (pre)history of pastoralism in Greece has been widely debated, and different scholars have claimed early pastoralism at dates which range from the Neolithic (or even the Upper Palaeolithic) to the Medieval period. In part, this lack of consensus has been due to the limitations of the evidence deployed: sparse and ambiguous written sources and remote archaeological ‘proxies’ such as site location, apparent impermanence of settlement, and long-distance similarities of material culture.

Today, macroscopic zooarchaeological data, stable isotopes, dental microwear, micromorphology and so on provide much more direct measures of human subsistence, the seasonality of settlement, animal diet, and the movement of people, animals and artefacts. Our dramatically improved archaeological methodology will produce few answers, however, until we can agree what our question is – what do we mean by ‘pastoralism’?

Prof. Halstead will address this last question by describing three overlapping, recent forms of animal husbandry in Greece: specialized pastoralism, large-scale mixed agro-pastoral farming, and small-scale mixed farming. He will then use these three models to interpret the available evidence for ‘pastoralism’ in Neolithic, Late Bronze Age and Classical Greece. Although Greece (modern and ancient) serves as a case study, both the models proposed and their tentative application should broadly be relevant to other parts of Mediterranean Europe.