IPHES participates in the I International Congress of Science, Feminism and New Masculinities

The researcher Magda Gómez presented the communication “Gender equality policies in Humanities research: the IPHES as a case study” with which she made known the “Equal opportunities Plan between men and women” and the progressive incorporation of the Responsible Research and Innovation perspective in the future research projects of this center.

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Magda Gómez, researcher at IPHES (Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution), participated in the international congress “Science, Feminism and New Masculinities (CICFEM), recently held in Valencia, organized by the University Association Science, Feminism and Masculinities (AUCFEM) , in collaboration with the INGENIO Institute (CSIC-UPV), the Universitat Politècnica de València and various feminist associations. Specifically, he presented the oral communication “Gender equality policies in Humanities research: the IPHES as a case study”.

The goal of CICFEM, as expressed by the organizers of this event, is to offer a space for dialogue and research linked to the lines of work set out in the 2030 United Nations Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), from a perspective of gender, equality and overcoming violence. Attended by specialists from various scientific fields, such as Humanities, Social Sciences, Engineering or Technological Sciences, in order to deepen and provide evidence specifically dealing with feminism and masculinities, but also about the actions that women undertake to improve society and that promote their presence in the present and future scientific story.

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It was within the framework of the sessions dedicated to Quality Education, where Magda Gómez presented her communication. On the one hand, she presented various actions carried out by IPHES to reduce gender inequalities at an institutional and structural level and, on the other hand, she explained the steps that this institute is conducting to include a gender perspective in the investigations and projects that are carried out.

In this regard, in the context of a strategic scientific policy, Magda Gómez explained how IPHES has signed the “European Charter for Researchers” and the “Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers”, which has resulted in the “Equal opportunities Plan between men and women” in the workplace. Likewise, the IPHES also advocates for the explicit and conscious incorporation of the so-called RRI (Responsible Research and Innovation) perspective in future research projects.

Currently, Magda Gómez works as a postdoctoral researcher in the European project PALEODEM ((ERC Co-Grant 683018), in the scope of chronological modeling and paleodemographic dynamics analysis of the last hunter-gatherers groups of the Iberian Peninsula (between 15,000 ago and 8,000 years before the present.). This project includes the gender perspective in paleodemography, in the line of recent works that claim the important role of women in the demography of small-scale societies.

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IPHES takes part in a study about the genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula

Marina Lozano and Josep Maria Vergès, IPHES researchers and URV associate professors, contributed with the recovering and anatomical analysis of dental human remains

An international team led by researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Spain has conducted the largest-ever study of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula, spanning 8,000 years.

Analyses suggest the Iberian Y chromosome was almost completely replaced between 4,000 and 4,500 years ago.

The largest study to date of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (modern-day Portugal and Spain) offers new insights into the populations that lived in this region over the last 8,000 years. The most startling discovery suggests that local Y chromosomes were almost completely replaced during the Bronze Age.

The work, published online in Science March 15 by a 111-person international team led by researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Barcelona, Spain, also details genetic variation among ancient hunter-gatherers, documents intermingling of ancient Iberians with people from North Africa and the Mediterranean, and provides an additional explanation for why present-day Basques, who have such a distinctive language and culture, are also ancestrally different from other Iberians.

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Marina Lozano analyzing dental remains from the Cova de la Guineu

The team analyzed genomes from 403 ancient Iberians who lived between about 6000 B.C. and 1600 A.D., 975 ancient people from outside Iberia and about 2,900 present-day people.

271 of the ancient Iberian genomes had not been published before. Nearly two-thirds came from skeletons no older than 2000 B.C., boosting by 25 times the number of publicly available genomes from this relatively recent period.

Marina Lozano and Josep Maria Vergès, researchers at IPHES (Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social) and associate professors at URV (Universitat Rovira i Virgili), both in Tarragona, contributed with the recovery of human remains from different archaeological sites, the crono-cultural context of human remains and analyzing the anatomy of some of the dental remains from which DNA has been extracted. In particular, seven human teeth from Cova dels Galls Carboners (Mont-ral, Tarragona, Spain) dated on Chalcolithic and Bronze Age (3,500-4,300 years ago). Other 4 teeth from Mas Gassol roman site (3rd-Vth centuries CE).  Finally, Marina Lozano identified 13 teeth from Cova de la Guineu Late Neolithic site (Barcelona), excavated by a team coming from Seminari d’Estudis i Recerques Prehistòriques (SERP) of the Universitat de Barcelona (UB).

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Josep Maria Vergès needs to climb to access the Cova dels Galls Carboners (Tarragona) – IPHES

The Institute for Evolutionary Biology is a joint institute of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona.

Major funders of this research included Obra Social La Caixa, FEDER-MINECO (BFU2015-64699-1118P), the National Institutes of Health (grant GM100233), the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

About Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School has more than 11,000 faculty working in the 11 basic and social science departments comprising the Blavatnik Institute and at the 15 Harvard-affiliated teaching hospitals and research institutes: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Cambridge Health Alliance, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Hebrew SeniorLife, Joslin Diabetes Center, Judge Baker Children’s Center, Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Schepens Eye Research Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, McLean Hospital, Mount Auburn Hospital, Spaulding Rehabilitation Network and VA Boston Healthcare System.

Reference

Iñigo Olalde et al. The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula over the past 8000 years. Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.aav1444